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Where are your finger prints in my care?

It is unlikely that you will be part of every encounter with the customer, client or patient whatever you do and wherever you work. A barista is not at the table with the customer is presented with their breakfast; a dressmaker isn’t at the checkout when the customer makes their purchase at a department store. Sooner or later you won’t be there in person. However it is likely that whatever you’ve contributed will have an impact. How do you define your role from this perspective in healthcare?

The participants—21 family physicians (fps), 15 surgeons, 12 medical oncologists, 6 radiation oncologists, and 4 general practitioners in oncology—were asked to describe both the role that fps currently play and the role that, in their opinion, fps should play in the future care of cancer patients across the cancer continuum. Participants identified 3 key roles: coordinating cancer care, managing comorbidities, and providing psychosocial care to patients and their families. However, fps and specialists discussed many challenges that prevent fps from fully performing those roles:

  • The fps described communication problems resulting from not being kept “in the loop” because they weren’t copied on patient reports and also the lack of clearly defined roles for all the various health care providers involved in providing care to cancer patients.

  • The specialists expressed concerns about a lack of patient access to fp care, leaving specialists to fill the care gaps. Easley et al

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Do something in your power to make a difference

It’s a small detail. If you are accompanying someone down a corridor as a healthcare professional- don’t stride ahead. Ideally walk alongside the person or let them lead the way if they know where you are headed. If they are wheeling a buggy and carrying a bag offer to help by wheeling the buggy.  Just try it. You might like how they respond. Apart from that you can learn so much about the person even before the consultation begins:

So instead of a doctor assessing a patient’s blood pressure, body mass index, chronic conditions, hospitalization and smoking history and use of mobility aids to estimate survival, a lab assistant could simply time the patient walking a few meters and predict just as accurately the person’s likelihood of living five or 10 more years—as well as a median life expectancy. Scientific American

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Do you use your powers of observation?

Healthcare professionals and doctors in particular need to be observant. Many, if most are observant because it can make the difference between an early diagnosis and an early demise. I remember an ambulance crew saving a patient’s life not only by their rapid transport of a confused suicidal patient but because they noticed and reported the white mark around the lip of the glass she had been found drinking from. It turned out it was soluble aspirin and the patient was quickly diagnosed with salcylism.

The same powers of observation can be used to find new solutions or perhaps better solutions to common problems. Healthcare professionals are in contact with patients more than any policy maker or bureaucrat. If history has taught us anything it is that the most valuable solutions to healthcare problems are likely to be generated by those who don’t dismiss small details.

In a sense, curiosity is the mother of innovation. People often think that they will struggle to be innovative because they feel that they are not creative. Creativity is certainly useful, but curiosity is really all that you need to get the process started. Curiosity about what’s going on around you, and then curiosity about how an idea would work in another context. So, turn off autopilot mode in your brain, and be curious! Paul Matthews

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Do you have a strategy for coping with frustration doctor?

It’s Friday evening. Your customer, client or patient needs something. You’ve been trying to arrange it or get the necessary authorisation over the phone and now you’ve been put on hold listening to musac. You had advised this person in all good faith that what they need to make a decision will be here today. The minutes tick by and then the phone goes dead. The queue of people waiting is growing longer. A tired child is screaming somewhere nearby and you are already running late.

Over 54% of physicians report a loss of enthusiasm for work, feelings of cynicism, and a low sense of personal accomplishment. The number is up 10% from just three years ago. Who is to blame? If you ask many physicians, the fault lies among leaders involved in healthcare finance, policy and clinical administration. Sachin Jain

You can choose your reaction to the trial by phone on Friday evening. This scenario is not uncommon and as a doctor it won’t be the first or last time you will experience it. Yet each time it happens it may evoke the same negative emotions until you choose otherwise

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What does your face say?

Are you aware what your facial muscles are doing when you are engaged in conversation? What about your neck and your shoulders? What do they leak about your mood? Your attitude? Your perspective? Is it possible they are sending entirely the wrong message?

Even though, there was no evidence found that displaying positive facial expression will increase the level of follower trust in their leader (both, affectively and cognitively) and their perceptions of leadership effectiveness, still the opposite was found to be true, which is a negative relationship between negative facial expressions and leadership effectiveness. This means, that the more the leader expresses negative facial cues such as lowered eyebrows and lip corners down, the less effective he or she is.

Pia Loeper, University of Twente

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Who taught you how to complain?

When during your training or your induction did anyone teach you how and when to express yourself when something did not meet with your expectations? Your parent might have said:

I know you’re angry darling but we don’t scratch and bite

How do your customers, clients, patients know how to complain? How did you learn to respond? Who models that behaviour for you? What is the approach to giving or receiving negative feedback where you work?

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