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How do you steer people away from trouble?

From time to time you will notice that your customer, client or patient is taking risks. How do you hope to steer them away from trouble? It’s more than what you say because information alone does not change minds.

It’s probably happened more than once: You spend a lot of time trying to convince someone that their opinion on a particular issue is wrong. You take pains to make sure your argument is air-tight. But instead of coming around to your point of view, your conversation partner pushes back, still convinced of her ultimate rightness. Elizabeth Svoboda 

In healthcare when people are overweight, smoking, drinking too much or have other risk factors for longterm illness it may be helpful to know who to try to advise. Not everyone is ready to change. In practice few practitioners give much thought to ‘who’ is ready.

In addition you might want to consider when to attempt to broach the subject:

Think about an event, an insight, an experience, a conversation that forever changed how you are or how you operate in the world. Although a small minority of people might mention something that happened in therapy, or a classroom, or formal learning experience, the vast majority of cases occurred after recovering from a challenging or even traumatic event—the death of a loved one, a major failure or disappointment, a crisis or catastrophe, a relationship or job ending, a threatening illness, or something similar. Jeffrey Kottler

You might want to ponder where people are most often open to review their ideas.

My favorite saying, obtained from Dr. Primack’s office, is “What you do today is important, because you are exchanging a day of your life for it”. So make it count, and learn how to be the best you that you can be. Swanson and Primack

Finally and perhaps most important- how you will attempt this most challenging of manoeuvres.

  • Many patients who smoke are sceptical about the power of doctors’ words to influence smoking since most know about the dangers, make their own evaluations, and feel that quitting is down to the individual
  • Opportunistic antismoking interventions should be sympathetic, not preaching, and centred on the patient as an individual
  • Repeated ritualistic intervention on the part of doctors may deter patients from seeking medical help when they need it
  • Smokers can be categorised as “contrary,” “matter of fact,” or “self blaming” in their reaction to antismoking advice
  • Doctors can tailor their approach according to the type of patient.

Butler et al BMJ

Whatever you do it does warrant some thought. In healthcare the stakes couldn’t be higher:

Current public health policy stresses the potential of cumulative, small changes in individual behaviour to produce significant advancements in population health. The Behavioural Insights Team or ‘Nudge Unit’ advocates for changes in health behaviour through manipulations of small environmental cues. The movement in the National Health Service (UK) to ‘make every contact count’ recognises the opportunity that practitioners have to improve public health through supporting behaviour change in the millions of people with whom they come into contact. It seems an appropriate moment to harness recent advances in behavioural science in the battle against the rising tide of Non Communicable Diseases threatening to engulf us. Kelly and Barker

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