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Quitting work may be the best thing you can do

 

Do you quit work? At least until it’s time to be back in the office, clinic, shop or hospital? Are you constantly taking calls and texts from work even on vacation?

Recreational travel may increase creativity by relieving workers from stress, providing diversifying experiences and increasing positive emotions. Consequently, vacations may boost creativity, apparent in a greater variety (flexibility) and originality of ideas after work resumption. de Bloom  et al

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Do you see how that happened?

You may face may challenges or have an unexpected outcome following your interaction with your customer, client or patient. As a healthcare professional these are opportunities to reflect on how an event unfolded, how you were feeling at the time and how you are feeling afterwards. Consider then how those emotions play out through the course of the day. Given that most  outcomes in healthcare are moderated by an interaction with a health professional it is important to ensure that the health professional is attuned to their inner world. We can’t change many things as providers of health services but we can look within.

Know what causes your negative emotions, and which types of feelings you face most often. When those emotions begin to appear, immediately start your strategy to interrupt the cycle. The longer you wait, the harder it will be to pull yourself away from negative thinking. Mindtools

Picture by Vishweshwar Saran Singh

Do you know their secret fear?

Do you know why your customer, client or patient chose you today? If you are his doctor John made an appointment this morning because he thinks he may have an inherited illness. His uncle recently died from this condition and it all started with weakness in his arm. John has noticed that he has pain and weakness in his right arm when he lifts heavy things at work. This morning he nearly dropped the kettle when making a cup of tea. He isn’t going to tell you what he is worried about but he expects you will tell him he doesn’t have that condition after all the tests you will perform right? His uncle had lots of blood tests and scans.

In quite a number of contacts with a new reason for an encounter (22%), the ideas, concerns, or expectations of the patient remain undisclosed. A second main finding is that the expression of concerns and/or expectations is correlated with fewer prescriptions (univariate, logistic regression analysis, and also after exclusion of patients without an ‘a priori need for medication’). Although the causal relationship remains uncertain, the observations may indicate that systematically disclosing the patients’ real expectations and concerns could lead to less medication use. Matthys et al

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What price do you pay?

Looking back it was the right decision for me. I decided to choose a different career the day I wiped mayonnaise off my tie. I didn’t want to have my meals on the run. The job wasn’t for me if the price was regularly having to eat out of a paper bag rushing around from place to place or sitting at my desk. Others felt differently. I had to make a choice that worked for me.

While 62 percent of doctors who were normal or underweight reported eating a healthy diet rich in fruits and vegetables, the survey revealed that 44 percent of heavier doctors eat a diet high in carbs, meat and fat, or “on the go” meals. Just 16 percent of doctors who were considered overweight or obese were on a diet meant to help them lose weight or restrict calories. Life

Picture by Chris Blakeley.

Small details matter

It’s a small detail. If you are accompanying someone down a corridor as a healthcare professional- don’t stride ahead. Ideally walk alongside the person or let them lead the way if they know where you are headed. If they are wheeling a buggy and carrying a bag offer to help by wheeling the buggy.  Just try it. You might like how they respond. Apart from that you can learn so much about the person even before the consultation begins:

So instead of a doctor assessing a patient’s blood pressure, body mass index, chronic conditions, hospitalization and smoking history and use of mobility aids to estimate survival, a lab assistant could simply time the patient walking a few meters and predict just as accurately the person’s likelihood of living five or 10 more years—as well as a median life expectancy. Scientific American

Picture by Salman Qadir

Is this something for today?

How your customer, client or patient responds to your advice, offer or recommendation will depend on factors that may have nothing to do with how these are presented to them.

Susan sat bolt upright glancing at her watch. Although she had only been waiting for ten minutes she was becoming irritated as she was keen to get away as soon as possible. It would be a long day ahead. The staff meeting was likely to be challenging. There was talk of redundancies. She wasn’t sure if her department would survive the purge. It had been a bad start to the year, the sales figures were down at least thirty percent and the company had appointed an external consultant to determine what should be done urgently. She was interviewed last week and she wasn’t sure if the consultant would recommend keeping her section open. Over the past six months she had been drinking more, the glass of wine with dinner was now two glasses. She was also snacking more during the day and the doughnut on the way home which had been a Friday afternoon treat were a daily habit. She was aware that her weight was becoming a problem but right now she just wanted to get through this nightmare. She didn’t come to the doctor often but she needed a script. She had argued with the pharmacist but he was adamant that he would not supply the steroid inhaler without a prescription. Finally the doctor summoned her through and noted that she was much heavier than he remembered. 

What happened next ……your call.

Picture by Neil Moralee

Let’s do it my way this time

Occasionally your customer, client or patient will come with their mind made up. Nothing you will say will make a difference to what they feel they need. In healthcare if what they want is going to harm them you will be duty bound to refuse just as you might refuse to serve alcohol to a drunk. But occasionally it may be difficult to argue.

Just one other thing, doctor, I need this wart burnt off.

Her doctor noticed the simple wart on her finger.

How about we try something that might be just as good? How about you try taping banana peel on this every night for a week. It will be far less uncomfortable and you might be surprised that the wart will just fall off.

Sure doctor. But today can we just burn it off and then if it comes back we might try the banana?

Picture by Marco Verch

Not all solutions are linear

We mistakenly believe that the path to solving some of our customer, client or patient’s problems is linear. Want to improve your liver function? Stop drinking alcohol. Want to lose weight? Go on a diet. Want to have more energy? Stop smoking. The ‘solution’ is simple. But it doesn’t usually work that way.

Sophie sat looking glazed as her doctor suggested a strict diet that might help her shed the kilos. It didn’t end well. She never lost any weight and eventually stopped attending that clinic. Her life was complicated. She had always been overweight and after the babies were born she got steadily heavier until she was obese. She lives in a modest two bedroom rented home with three children and partner. He works as a bus driver. Sophie does shifts at a laundry when her friend needs help covering the roster. The family buy their clothes second hand and just about pay their bills. At the weekend they go to the mall and have a takeaway meal from the food court. Sophie enjoys the day at the mall where she meets her friends and spend the afternoon gossiping while the children are in the play area. She didn’t learn to cook and her small kitchen is barely equipped to turn out the simplest meal. She never enjoyed school and can’t read. In quiet moments Sophie admits she doesn’t like the way life turned out but she has dreams that she might win the lottery and then life will be so much better.

With this as her back story the diet and exercise program wasn’t appealing. She may decide she wants to reduce the risk of developing diabetes, a condition that impacted her father. It may be a meandering journey but the best coach will stick with her.

Picture by jurek d.

What stories do you tell?

We all have stories about what we do for a living.  We tell them all the time- even if we don’t recognize that we are telling stories.  They communicate how we feel about our work. Do your stories convey the impression that you are stressed out, bored, bullied, treated unfairly and in general can’t wait to retire? You realise that this is also your self talk and that ultimately you will magnify these experiences. On the other hand if you started telling stories about experiences that energized you, made you feel valued and creative then you might notice more about your job that seems to resonate with what you want and how you want to feel.

At 9 o’clock one bright morning a 32 year of man had been waiting for an hour in a busy clinic. He was called into the doctor’s office. Covered in tattoos, he was a muscular man whose tanned skin suggested a life outdoors. He wore a high vis vest and heavy steel capped boots.

I’ve had a toothache since three o’clock this morning doctor and I need to get to work

He said rubbing his jaw. His doctor was curious, it was odd that a man who seemed very robust in every other way, was getting ready to go to work would wait for an hour in a busy clinic complaining about toothache that started a few hours ago. But of course that wasn’t the whole story. The doctor watched him rubbing his jaw and the side of his neck.

Where did the pain start?

In my chest doctor, it was like someone was sitting on my chest, I felt a bit nauseous and it seems to have settled in my jaw and the side of my neck. I think it’s going into my shoulder now.

Half an hour later the man was in hospital being treated for a heart attack. His decision to get to a doctor might just have saved his life and his doctor’s curiosity paid of.

Picture by Jonathan Moureau

What I’m taking is better than anything you can suggest

We don’t know why some people respond to some treatments.  Helen produced a bottle of cough medicine from her handbag.

This stuff is magic. It cures my cough every time.

You recall a recent paper which concluded:

Across Europe, there are large variations in the recommendations made by healthcare professionals for the treatment of acute cough. This has arisen through custom and practice based on the evidence of historical studies performed to standards well short of what would be considered legitimate today. Acute cough is particularly difficult to study in a controlled setting because of the high rate of spontaneous remission and a large placebo effect. Morice and Kardos

What do you say? Whatever you say and however you frame it is worth considering before it happens- because Helen isn’t the only one taking what might be considered a placebo.

Picture by _Val_