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Assuming a persona might help to arrest Covid

‘The Art of Doctoring’ available from Amazon books

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Covid will impact all of our health

Homebound status is associated with poorer physical and mental health, as well as disability in the elderly. We aimed to examine the prevalence and the role of homebound status on mortality in a representative sample of the French non-institutionalized population. This study included 7497 people aged 65 and over who were interviewed in 1999 and 2001 about the consequences of health problems on activities of daily living. Homebound status was defined as staying permanently inside the home, excluding an accident or a temporary illness. The influence of the homebound status on two-year mortality was assessed in a logistic regression model adjusted for the main confounders (age, sex, living as a couple, physical and mental impairments). The prevalence of homebound status was 4.7% (95% CI: 3.9–5.4) in this study. The number of homebound elderly was estimated at 421 000 in France. The prevalence of homebound status increases with age and reaches 33.9% in people aged 95–99 years (95% CI: 13.1–54.6). Compared to non-homebound subjects, homebound elderly were more likely to be female, widower, to live alone and to have had a former low level job. Homebound status was associated with a number of physical and mental impairments. It increased the risk of dying within two years with an adjusted OR 3.45 (95% CI: 2.66–4.46). Homebound status should be considered as an indicator of frailty and used in the identification of old people likely to benefit from preventive interventions.

Herr et al. Homebound status increases death risk within two years in the elderly: Results from a national longitudinal survey

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A global and urgent need to change our behaviour

Public engagement in ethically laden pandemic planning decisions may be important for transparency, creating public trust, improving compliance with public health orders, and ultimately, contributing to just outcomes. We conducted focus groups with members of the public to characterize public perceptions about social distancing measures likely to be implemented during a pandemic. Participants expressed concerns about job security and economic strain on families if businesses or school closures are prolonged. They shared opposition to closure of religious organizations, citing the need for shared support and worship during times of crises. Group discussions elicited evidence of community-mindedness (e.g., recognition of an extant duty not to infect others), while some also acknowledged strong self-interest. Participants conveyed desire for opportunities for public input and education, and articulated distrust of government. Social distancing measures may be challenging to implement and sustain due to strains on family resources and lack of trust in government.

“Listen to the People”: Public Deliberation About Social Distancing Measures in a Pandemic
Nancy M. Baum , Peter D. Jacobson  & Susan D. Goold

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