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Your greatest value is your ability to solve problems

As a healthcare professional you may face problems that require problem solving at the least and the generation of creative solutions ideally. How do you hone your creativity?

The results revealed that leadership clarity is associated with clear team objectives, high levels of participation, commitment to excellence, and support for innovation. Team processes consistently predicted team innovation across all three samples. Team leadership predicted innovation in the latter two samples, and there was some evidence that team processes partly mediated this relationship. The results imply the need for theory that incorporates clarity and not just style of leadership. For health care teams in particular, and teams in general, the results suggest a need to ensure leadership is clear in teams when innovation is a desirable team performance outcome. West et al

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What did you expect yesterday?

As you walked through the front doors at work yesterday what were your expectations? Were you hoping:

  1. To serve to the best of your ability
  2. To learn something new
  3. To enjoy good company doing something meaningful
  4. To make a difference to someone
  5. To earn a big pay cheque
  6. To pass the time before home time
  7. Something else?

Which was it? How did you feel at the end of the day? How do you think those who interacted with you felt at the end of the day?

Picture by Gotcredit

Do you see how that happened?

You may face may challenges or have an unexpected outcome following your interaction with your customer, client or patient. As a healthcare professional these are opportunities to reflect on how an event unfolded, how you were feeling at the time and how you are feeling afterwards. Consider then how those emotions play out through the course of the day. Given that most  outcomes in healthcare are moderated by an interaction with a health professional it is important to ensure that the health professional is attuned to their inner world. We can’t change many things as providers of health services but we can look within.

Know what causes your negative emotions, and which types of feelings you face most often. When those emotions begin to appear, immediately start your strategy to interrupt the cycle. The longer you wait, the harder it will be to pull yourself away from negative thinking. Mindtools

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What do you notice?

Before making any changes that might improve outcomes where you work you have to notice things that don’t look quite right or that hint at a solution. I know someone who notices the tiniest details even when she is out shopping. She generates a huge number of ideas about how things could be improved sometimes with the smallest tweaks. Here’s an example. As a result she is the most successful person I know. You’d be lucky to have her on your side. I know I am. What did you notice about your office, clinic, shop or hospital today?

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Are the barriers to access in healthcare physical?

Imagine you have back pain. Your doctor suggests you need special scan. You have to travel an hour across town to get to the hospital where you have an appointment at 9 am. You take the morning off but hope you might get to work in the afternoon. It’s peak hour traffic as you arrive at the hospital. The queue to get into the car park stretches down the street. You join the line of cars and realise it’s now 8.45am. The X-ray department is a long walk from the car park. Just as you get to the entrance to the parking lot the attendant indicates that it is full and you have to try and get a spot on a side street. The chap in the car behind you is getting frustrated- are you waiting in the queue or trying to back out? It’s a one way street you can’t turn the car here. It’s now 9 am you are going to be late- not sure how late. You toy with the idea of just going home.

In November 2011, an editorial in the Canadian Medical Association Journal called hospital parking fees a barrier to health care, saying the charges amount to “parking-centred health care,” and recommended hospitals stop charging patients for parking. The editorial stirred up a debate in the media. The Ontario Nurses’ Association, for one, agreed with the recommendation and noted that many of its members could tell stories about patients who had avoided seeking care or had cut appointments because of high parking costs. Canadian Nurse

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Do you perform any rituals when you consult?

Before a surgeon gets anywhere near a patient in the operating theatre he must wash his hands, put on a gown and gloves. He then drapes the patient and cleans the skin. As he makes his first incision there is no mobile phone on the table, he banishes all distractions and appreciates that the job isn’t over until he has sutured the wound. Whatever you do for a living how do you approach the job? If you adopted rituals would you perform better? Bacteria can destroy a surgeons work. What contaminates your work and how does that manifest in your results?

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Do you have a strategy for coping with frustration doctor?

It’s Friday evening. Your customer, client or patient needs something. You’ve been trying to arrange it or get the necessary authorisation over the phone and now you’ve been put on hold listening to musac. You had advised this person in all good faith that what they need to make a decision will be here today. The minutes tick by and then the phone goes dead. The queue of people waiting is growing longer. A tired child is screaming somewhere nearby and you are already running late.

Over 54% of physicians report a loss of enthusiasm for work, feelings of cynicism, and a low sense of personal accomplishment. The number is up 10% from just three years ago. Who is to blame? If you ask many physicians, the fault lies among leaders involved in healthcare finance, policy and clinical administration. Sachin Jain

You can choose your reaction to the trial by phone on Friday evening. This scenario is not uncommon and as a doctor it won’t be the first or last time you will experience it. Yet each time it happens it may evoke the same negative emotions until you choose otherwise

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What does your face say?

Are you aware what your facial muscles are doing when you are engaged in conversation? What about your neck and your shoulders? What do they leak about your mood? Your attitude? Your perspective? Is it possible they are sending entirely the wrong message?

Even though, there was no evidence found that displaying positive facial expression will increase the level of follower trust in their leader (both, affectively and cognitively) and their perceptions of leadership effectiveness, still the opposite was found to be true, which is a negative relationship between negative facial expressions and leadership effectiveness. This means, that the more the leader expresses negative facial cues such as lowered eyebrows and lip corners down, the less effective he or she is.

Pia Loeper, University of Twente

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Who taught you how to complain?

When during your training or your induction did anyone teach you how and when to express yourself when something did not meet with your expectations? Your parent might have said:

I know you’re angry darling but we don’t scratch and bite

How do your customers, clients, patients know how to complain? How did you learn to respond? Who models that behaviour for you? What is the approach to giving or receiving negative feedback where you work?

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