Latest blog postsLearn More

Can doctors do something about the wait?

Respondents

Dr. Eric Last

Carly Flumer

Dana Deighton

Daniel G Garza

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Doctors sometimes have to be accountants

Respondents

Eric Last

Carly Flumer

Daniel G Garza

Photo by Alexander Mils from Pexels

The patient may chose to involve their family

Respondents

Eric Last

Geri Lynn Baumblatt

Carly Flumer

Photo by Andrea Piacquadio from Pexels

Your body may betray you without you knowing

Respondents

Photo by Ketut Subiyanto from Pexels

How we say it matters as much as what we say

Respondents

Eric Last

Carly Flumer

Kimberly Warner

Dana Deighton

Rod Ritchie

Photo by LinkedIn Sales Navigator on Unsplash

The waiting room matters

Responses by

Eric Last

Carly Flumer

Daniel G Garza

Photo by R O on Unsplash

The prescription at the end of the consultation

Respondents

Rick Davis

Carly Flumer

Photo by pina messina on Unsplash

Why your doctor examines you

In the second question in our two-minute question series Dr. Moyez Jiwa, host of the Health Design podcast asks if the clinical examination is a crucial part of the experience when visiting a doctor.

The respondents have all been featured in our podcasts. You an hear the longer conversations here:

Photo by Hush Naidoo on Unsplash

Covid will impact all of our health

Homebound status is associated with poorer physical and mental health, as well as disability in the elderly. We aimed to examine the prevalence and the role of homebound status on mortality in a representative sample of the French non-institutionalized population. This study included 7497 people aged 65 and over who were interviewed in 1999 and 2001 about the consequences of health problems on activities of daily living. Homebound status was defined as staying permanently inside the home, excluding an accident or a temporary illness. The influence of the homebound status on two-year mortality was assessed in a logistic regression model adjusted for the main confounders (age, sex, living as a couple, physical and mental impairments). The prevalence of homebound status was 4.7% (95% CI: 3.9–5.4) in this study. The number of homebound elderly was estimated at 421 000 in France. The prevalence of homebound status increases with age and reaches 33.9% in people aged 95–99 years (95% CI: 13.1–54.6). Compared to non-homebound subjects, homebound elderly were more likely to be female, widower, to live alone and to have had a former low level job. Homebound status was associated with a number of physical and mental impairments. It increased the risk of dying within two years with an adjusted OR 3.45 (95% CI: 2.66–4.46). Homebound status should be considered as an indicator of frailty and used in the identification of old people likely to benefit from preventive interventions.

Herr et al. Homebound status increases death risk within two years in the elderly: Results from a national longitudinal survey

Photo by Noah Silliman on Unsplash

How can you add value as a family doctor?

Ninety percent of people will consult a family doctor in 2020. The graph on the left suggests why they will do so. A significant number will have minor self limiting illness, a larger proportion will have chronic/ long-term illness and most will attend for multiple reasons. The graph on right demonstrates that most people will have risk factors for long-term illness often more than one risk factor. To reduce the risk(s) they will need to change their lifestyle. The challenge in primary care is to add value by triggering/ prompting lifestyle change. That is a very specialist skill set. Mandates a new paradigm and or a new set of tools.

Photo by Lāsma Artmane on Unsplash