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What did you expect yesterday?

As you walked through the front doors at work yesterday what were your expectations? Were you hoping:

  1. To serve to the best of your ability
  2. To learn something new
  3. To enjoy good company doing something meaningful
  4. To make a difference to someone
  5. To earn a big pay cheque
  6. To pass the time before home time
  7. Something else?

Which was it? How did you feel at the end of the day? How do you think those who interacted with you felt at the end of the day?

Picture by Gotcredit

What stories do you tell?

We all have stories about what we do for a living.  We tell them all the time- even if we don’t recognize that we are telling stories.  They communicate how we feel about our work. Do your stories convey the impression that you are stressed out, bored, bullied, treated unfairly and in general can’t wait to retire? You realise that this is also your self talk and that ultimately you will magnify these experiences. On the other hand if you started telling stories about experiences that energized you, made you feel valued and creative then you might notice more about your job that seems to resonate with what you want and how you want to feel.

At 9 o’clock one bright morning a 32 year of man had been waiting for an hour in a busy clinic. He was called into the doctor’s office. Covered in tattoos, he was a muscular man whose tanned skin suggested a life outdoors. He wore a high vis vest and heavy steel capped boots.

I’ve had a toothache since three o’clock this morning doctor and I need to get to work

He said rubbing his jaw. His doctor was curious, it was odd that a man who seemed very robust in every other way, was getting ready to go to work would wait for an hour in a busy clinic complaining about toothache that started a few hours ago. But of course that wasn’t the whole story. The doctor watched him rubbing his jaw and the side of his neck.

Where did the pain start?

In my chest doctor, it was like someone was sitting on my chest, I felt a bit nauseous and it seems to have settled in my jaw and the side of my neck. I think it’s going into my shoulder now.

Half an hour later the man was in hospital being treated for a heart attack. His decision to get to a doctor might just have saved his life and his doctor’s curiosity paid of.

Picture by Jonathan Moureau

Do you take the shortest route to add value?

Every thriving business adds value. If it didn’t it would not exist. Healthcare shares many points of difference with any other service but none is more remarkable than the  ability to forge connections via the physical examination. It meets our fundamental need when we are ill.

Treatment that uses direct touch can have a depth and potency that can have a great therapeutic impact, which provides some explanation for why so many people are seeking out their own “professional touchers” or are filling the waiting rooms of physicians, waiting for the doctor to find the cause of the pain and make them better. In the process, they are touched. When the patient is assured that the work of the professional toucher is free from infringement, that sexual contact is clearly out of bounds, and that the patient can say “no” to any intervention the body-work practitioner proposes, then the patient can have the experience of trust and physical touch in the context of a controlled respectful relationship. Sharon K Farber

If you are a healthcare professional in what proportion of cases don’t  you perform a physical exam? Why?

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Who taught you how to complain?

When during your training or your induction did anyone teach you how and when to express yourself when something did not meet with your expectations? Your parent might have said:

I know you’re angry darling but we don’t scratch and bite

How do your customers, clients, patients know how to complain? How did you learn to respond? Who models that behaviour for you? What is the approach to giving or receiving negative feedback where you work?

Picture by Paco Trinidad Photo

Are you curious?

In your dealings with people who seek your help- Do you ask a lot of questions? Do you make many assumptions? How is that working out for you? How do you know you already have all the information when you start to offer the advice? What do you know about the context in which they are seeking your counsel?

Picture by Scott Billings

Are you sure they can help?

One of the key roles in healthcare is to refer people to other sources of help. The list of therapists, specialists and clinics is as long as any phone directory. However off loading someone elsewhere is hardly worthwhile if it’s a waste of time and money.

The goal should always be the initiation of a discussion about a patient’s needs and the beginning of a triaging process to address these, rather than problem identification being an end‐goal itself. Gemma Skaczkowski

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Are you credible as a lifestyle coach?

The commonest conditions doctors encounter are illnesses directly related to poor life style choices. Diseases that arise because we eat too much and don’t take enough exercise.

People who seek healthcare advice will be told more often than not that they must make different choices. How credible is your advice as a doctor? How persuasive are you as the messenger? How could you do this better?

Picture by Cocoabiscuit ,

Are you sure you will focus on the right problem?

In any business where you are paid to solve problems you need to be clear that you are indeed solving the right problem. Doctors can frame the problem in many ways- if their patient has been brought in after a car accident then ‘the problem’ is  clearly the broken leg or the bleeding wound. What’s much less obvious is the problem that needs to be solved in all other circumstances.

In the moment you are sitting in front of the doctor the problem isn’t the runny nose, the headache, the sore throat or the anxiety. Being told it’s just a virus won’t help. You need that  doctor to give you their undivided attention and to see the context in which you are experiencing that discomfort. To acknowledge your distress. There is ‘no cure’ for a viral upper respiratory tract infection and you knew that before you walked into that office. Right?

Pcture by Luis Sarabia

Essentialism wins

Dear Friends,

I have decided to take a break from my blog for a little while and focus on writing my book.

Sometimes it is a case of realising that you must invest in the big things in your life.

Thank you to my partner and mentor Bernadette. In case you are wondering-yes, she is even better than you know.

Thank you to Greg McKeown for persuading me to focus.

See you again very soon.

Moyez.

Picture by Bethan

If your fix only works if people choose option A abandon it

There is an obsession with getting clinicians to ‘follow guidelines’. There are those in the world who appear to believe with an evangelical zeal that ‘if only’ people over there would do as we tell them everything would be fine. They rely on the questionable assumption that human behaviour is always rational.

If only doctors would refer those people or prescribe that drug in this instance. If only doctors ordered this or that test in these circumstances. If only this or that which relies upon someone making choices that solve somebody else’s problem.  And so as conference season approaches academics will share stories about experiments that all too predictably didn’t end well. Or pretend that they have finally solved a problem that no one in history could sort out. Except that neither have they.

Because access to specialists is limited by cost there is a belief that family doctors can ration care by referring urgently only those cases that ‘merit’ referral based on criteria determined by ‘experts’. Cancer is a case in point. Except that ‘cancer’ is not a single condition, its biology varies as do the complex responses of its victims. General Practitioners (GPs) know this. A patient can present with hardly any symptoms and die of metastatic cancer within 3 months or present with a plethora of complaints and be diagnosed with a very early and treatable malignancy.

The ‘solution’ to selecting people considered to be at high risk for referral to a specialist appeared to be an interactive referral tool that automatically deploys algorithms based on guidelines. This ‘solution’ relies on GPs recognising anyone who presents with ‘red flag’ symptoms, deploying the software and patients being prioritised once an urgent referral is received at the hospital. The solution is based on the assumption that if one person in the chain does X then the people in the other part of the system would do Y and the outcome would be Z. Maybe you can already see it wasn’t going to end well.

  1. GPs did not always recognise the symptom complexes that were touted as the hallmarks of risk.BMJ open
  2. GPs were reticent to deploy the software other than in the conditions of a simulation. BMC Family Practice
  3. Specialists did not prioritise those cases that guidelines identified as urgent. BJGP

There is also limited evidence that people referred with reference to such criteria are always going to have better outcomes.

Here’s the thing:

  1. Diseases like cancer have a different impact on everyone
  2. People with cancer don’t present the same way
  3. Doctors may not agree with the experts
  4. Doctors may choose not to deploy an innovation for reasons various
  5. The ‘system’ consists of many moving parts. Supposing there were seven such parts. If the ‘right thing’ was to occur 80% of the time at each step then only 21% of people would benefit from the ‘plan’. Glasziou and Haynes

In the innovation business solutions cannot rely on the ‘if only’ option. Effective innovations trigger people to do what they already want to do. The best innovators work on solutions that are easily and enthusiastically adopted by their target audience.

Picture by Jurgen Appelo